7 Ways Personality Can Impact Networking Outcomes

building relationships, Building trust, Business-building, Networking as a marketing strategy, Networking for sales success No Comments

Research has confirmed that personality is a compilation of four basic behavioral styles. Each of us incorporates the four styles into thoughts, conversations and behavior. Over 75% of the contacts you make will be with differing (and sometimes contradictory) personality styles. We’ve all had the experience of meeting someone where the contact and the conversation have been less than pleasant, even uncomfortable.

This is sometimes the case when two people with different “preferred” networking styles meet. Because their networking interests and their priorities are at opposite ends of the personality spectrum, they fail to connect properly, essentially creating a non-connection which can leave both with a negative perspective of the experience. So the next time you feel this happening, here’s what you can do.

1. Accept that personality styles impact networking results. We are highly emotional creatures with individual and unique characteristics. As such we must accept that we may not always connect with others in ways we anticipate. Up to 75% of the people we meet think differently and as a result tend to behave differently than we do. It’s a fact of life.

2. Recognize that stress can affect networking behavior. Stress is a natural response to real or perceived danger. Meeting others takes many people out of their natural comfort zone and exposes them to the (perceived) risk of being rejected. Their networking style becomes an expression of stress-related behavior that they may not even be aware of.

3. Become more aware of your preferred networking style. Your networking style is a direct extension of your personality. It has a tremendous impact on the way others perceive you. You cannot change your style but by becoming more aware of your preferred style you can more easily leverage your strengths and minimize the chances of falling prey to stress-related behavior in future interactions.

4. Clarify the preferred networking style of your target market and ideal clients. This tactic can, by itself lead to more and better networking success. Review the main personality traits of your clients and colleagues. Then prepare for networking success by planning communication options that allow you to complement their networking style. That way, you can more effectively leverage opportunities with these important contacts into additional results.

5. Develop networking style success strategies for each networking style. Develop the discipline of identifying the preferred networking style of your conversation partner. Then adapt your communication to facilitate and develop increase rapport and build trust. Become more aware of stress-related networking fallback styles and techniques to move others into their networking comfort zone. Others will automatically feel more comfortable with you and work on your behalf.

6. Don’t let first impressions be your only gauge of relationship compatibility and success. This reality can be the most valuable networking idea in this document. The next time you meet someone who rubs you the wrong way or turns you off, remember the fact that it may not be them, it may be you. Raise your networking antennae above your discomfort and assess her/him and the networking style. You find, more often than not, the differing styles are causing this.

7. Above all, don’t take it personally. Meeting others can be a traumatic experience. When others don’t respond as positively as we expect or want, we tend to take it personally. Use the information in this document to remind you that it’s not you they are not responding to, it’s your networking style.

Want to know what you preferred networking style is? Email me at info@NetworkingForResults and I’ll send you my proprietary NfR Networking Personality Style Assessment to determine how to maximize this important area.
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Michael Hughes is known as North America’s Networking Guru. To get more info about his services or to have him speak at your next meeting or conference, visit his web site at www.NetworkingForResults.com

12 Benefits of Starting Your Own Networking Group.

building relationships, Building trust, Business-building, Generating referrals, Job or career search, Networking as a marketing strategy, Networking for sales success, Networking groups No Comments

You’re sick and tired of attending events where others run the show. You’ve tried the pay-for-play referral groups around town and have found them to be more about the few who run the show than about helping you achieve more success.

How can you use networking as a business or career growth strategy that works for you? It’s simple: start your own group. Here’s a dozen reasons why this can be a huge step in accelerating your results.

1. Increase your business. The simple fact of bringing together a number of prospects, be they colleagues or clients, will offer you opportunity to exponentially generate more revenues by being in front of more people at one time.

2. Get others to refer you business. When you bring others together, they appreciate your efforts. They will want to return the favor you have done for them. One of the ways they will do this is by recommending you to others.

3. Position yourself as a leader. Acting as the catalyst in creating the group, you position yourself as a leader. The members of the group automatically respect you and have a higher level of trust in you.

4. Increase your value to others. When the members of your group come together, they will meet new contacts and make new friends. They will associate these great feelings with you and feel you have brought them value.

5. Improve the perception of your professionalism. Your efforts in creating and managing the group will have others perceive you differently. You will be seen as a qualified professional who cares about others.

6. Build trust in others more quickly. Your position as a leader brings with it a number of unconscious qualities. One of the most powerful is trust. Others will trust you more as you contribute to their lives and their success.

7. Have others better realize your level of expertise about your product or service. In leading your group, you will cause others to become more aware of your expertise. This realization will extend to their perception of your products and services. They will see them differently just as they see you differently.

8. Better leverage existing relationships. Bringing together existing contacts, colleagues and clients acts as a leverage factor and heightens feelings of value and service about you. They will then go out of their way to be of service to you in return.

9. More quickly leverage new relationships. As you offer new contacts the opportunity to participate in your group, they will feel more trustworthy and indebted. This is one of the most powerful ways to build relationships.

10. Market yourself to more people in a shorter period of time. As members join and bring their colleagues and contacts into the group, you will find that you are, by default, marketing to more people with one activity.

11. Find more ways to help others. As a result of interacting with more people within the group, you will have more options available to help others. You will have access to more resources, support and opportunities.

12. Develop a cost-effective strategy to grow your business. Starting your group will require an initial investment. Once in motion, it will act as an on-going marketing vehicle that gives you access to an on-going stream of prospects.

Is this an option that could work for you? I’ve written a 16-page Executive Overview of everything you need to know to successfully start and run a networking group. Email me at info@NetworkingForResults.com and I’ll send you a complimentary copy.


Michael Hughes is known as North America’s Networking Guru. To find out more about him or have him share his expertise at your next meeting or conference visit www.NetworkingForResults.com.

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